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GAC calls for businesses to invest in 'borderless learning'

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    21 May 2012

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In-house learning academies, e-learning technologies and robust ROI measures are key to modernising training and driving up performance, says GAC

21 May 2012, Sri Lanka - GAC, the global shipping, logistics and marine services provider, has called for businesses to invest in tailored training solutions and 'borderless learning' to maximise the potential of their workforce.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaking at the prestigious HRM Awards Learning Conference in Sri Lanka last week, Damien O'Donoghue, General Manager of the GAC Corporate Academy (GCA), outlined the benefits of a 'borderless learning' model of corporate training, which combines in-house learning organisations, e-learning solutions and robust Return on Investment (ROI) measures, all of which reflect GAC's renowned approach to corporate learning.

 

Mr O'Donoghue said: "We all recognise the importance of investing in our staff, but have tended to rely on traditional concepts of the training department and the training environment. By contrast, borderless learning is an innovative new approach that challenges our assumptions about where and how learning takes place.  It is particularly suitable for the global shipping, logistics and marine businesses, which face the challenges and costs of delivering training across a globally dispersed workforce."

"Borderless learning needs three essential ingredients to make it work. First, an in-house learning organisation that establishes a culture of learning and develops learning programmes clearly linked to the company's business strategy. Second, the use of e-learning as an effective training tool. Third, a robust approach to measuring ROI to demonstrate value and the trade-offs between the costs and returns of learning activities."

New models of corporate learning are developing rapidly, with the emergence of fully-fledged in-house training organisations, such as the GAC Corporate Academy which delivers bespoke training aligned with the company's culture, business strategy and industry specific requirements.

Mr O'Donoghue added that technological advances also mean that e-learning can now deliver a more cost-effective and productive training solution.

"At the GAC Corporate Academy, we have built a learning organisation that uses e-learning to meet the needs of a multinational company spanning over 40 countries and 300 offices. Rather than off-the-shelf products, we also create our own customised courses with GAC-specific content that is tailored precisely to our needs and, importantly, to meet the requirements of our customers." 

"Instead of teaching 'at people', we are involving them in learning communities with colleagues from around the world. Indeed, 2011 was our most successful year, with 77 different courses and a record number of participants from across the GAC Group."

He stressed the importance of ensuring that the Return on Investment of corporate learning can be measured, particularly in the current economic environment.

"Intuitively, we know training is good. It improves employee productivity and retention, company competitiveness and customer satisfaction.  But in tough economic times, we also need to measure it. Each company should evaluate the performance of its corporate learning against appropriate Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for the corporate objectives the company has set for its learning programme. GAC uses a number of different KPIs as well as an Employee Satisfaction Survey to measure our progress, year-on-year, in developing skillful and motivated people."

GAC Corporate Academy is the corporate learning organisation of the GAC Group and delivers a wide range of e-learning courses. Established five years ago, GCA is an internationally recognised leader in its field, winning the People Development Award in the 2011 International Bulk Journal Awards.

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